AT&T Merlin, part two

The Merlin systems were basically from the beginning designed to be a workgroup phone system to compare it to the computer networking world. While the Merlin phones look so big business, and in some cases they were. Small Key units like the Merlin were installed in large environments against existing Centrex and electromechanical or analog/digital PBX systems. Because those systems already had 8 or 9 for the outside line, this would be redundant and therefore the Merlin did not have this feature. For small setups it was easy to pick up the phone and make a call. However this one and succeeding phone systems, many central offices would get quick off/on hook statuses because the users would be making an internal call. One trick was to hit the Intercom on hook then pick up the set.

 

A picture of the AT&T Merlin Operator Console

A picture of an AT&T Merlin Receptionist Console that looked almost like a BIS 34D with the BLF console fused in together with an interesting display. It was supported on a Merlin II, System 25 and Legend systems only.

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AT&T Sourcebook – Spring 1988

Last week, I got a nice steal on eBay, a Spring 1988, AT&T Sourcebook. This was once a catalog that you could get and theroretically a nobody could acquire an AT&T phone system. This was the companion sales channel to nobodies to the AT&T Phone Center Store.

This was a surprise. I thought it would be a small little thing, turns out it’s a full catalog. For the next few days, I’ll post reasonable sized images of the catalog. And in the future pictures in this catalog will be used in other subjects involving Avaya Red systems of the time.

$8 for this thing!

Of course the inset cover page is touting the AT&T Merlin product.

Inset featuring a sketch of the AT&T Merlin phones with the tagline "That Merlin of King Arthur's Age Would weep with envy if he knew The ease of telecommunication AT&T invented just for you.

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Remembering Avaya: Robin and the Vectors

Per to the YouTube description of Martin Askinazi

Robin and the Vectors was a group that started in the mid 90’s at AT&T. We created song parodies about the call center products developed by AT&T/Lucent Technologies/Avaya and created these videos to present and the User Group each year. The band consisted of Robin DeLorenzo (lead singer), Marty Askinazi (Guitar/Vocals/Producer), Zack Taylor (Lyrics), Walter Bier (Sax) and Alex Fattorusso (Bass)

If you couldn’t tell by the name of the c-rated band, this was most likely a marketing ploy for their call center offerings. This was the time in the mid 1990s when AT&T and Lucent was behind in the lucrative market of call centers. The Definity PBX had out of the box support for call centers in enterprise accounts; and it wasn’t too long after they dominated (for all the right reasons!)

This video is a series of several posts.

Rants: at&t Acquires TimeWarner (They THINK They Can)

AT&T (nee SBC, nee Southwestern Bell) dropped a story Friday evening while some of the East Coast was disrupted by the DDOS attack that they had intentions to acquire Time Warner, the owner of CNN (the Cheap News Network), HBO, Warner Pictures, etc. for about $85 billion dollars.

Of course, this is subject to approval by the Federal Communications Commission, and similar to the NBCUniversal/Comcast acquisition from GE in 2010; expect concessions and terms of sale to also follow.

This deal however, does not include Time Warner Cable (historically branded for it’s Road Runner triple play services) which was spun off several years ago, but kept the name and the “sight and sound” logo.

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