Telephone Booths!

A telephone booth…is a small structure furnished with a payphone and designed for a telephone user’s convenience. Such a booth usually has lighting, a door to provide privacy, and windows to let others know if the booth is in use. The booth may be furnished with a printed directory of local telephone numbers, and a booth in a formal setting, such as a hotel, may be furnished with paper and pen and even a seat. An outdoor booth may be made of metal and plastic to withstand the elements and heavy use, while an indoor booth may have more elaborate architecture and furnishings. Most outdoor booths feature the name and logo of the telephone service provider.

Wikipedia article on the Telephone booth (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/telephone_booth), Wikipedia, accessed spring of 2015.

I guess I should say I was lucky to have been taken pictures inside what is now structures no longer in existence in many places. As I grew up in the 90s, even in the world of mobile phones, payphones were in many places. Telephone booths in the sense shown on this page were not common where I grew up, but payphones were like I said very common.

 

CANTERBURY, NH REST STOP – INTERSTATE 93 NB (2016)

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OGUNQUIT, MAINE (2000)

I was 13 when my mother took a couple shots of what I believed was my first encounter with a traditional “phone booth:

 

LEGOLAND California (Carlsbad), 2001 Sponsored by Pacific Bell, California’s primary LEC (the company later rebranded to their parent company SBC later rebadged as “at&t”). Whether or not they continued to sponsor Legoland is unconfirmed.

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MASSACHUSETTS STATE HOUSE (2009)

Before politicians in the Massachusetts General Court (a.k.a. the local legislature) were all professional politicians, rank-and-file politicans would preform business in these cubicles. Many years later, a vast majority of the politicians have some real office all the amenities such as cubicles, PCs and Avaya digital or even IP telephones. These fuzzy pictures were taken in 2009 on a faulty SD card (or the lack of understanding photography as well.)

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NEW YORK STATE CAPITAL (2011)

I am going to assume the NYS Capital building had a similar setup to the Massachusetts State House of workspace before the age of carrer politicians

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CANNON MOUNTAIN SKI AREA (2014)

These types of booths without doors were common, without doors unlike the ones shown elsewhere in the Northeast (in my younger days of the 1990s.)

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 CONNECTICUT STATE CAPITAL (2009)

From the looks of it, this would’ve been a telephone booth, although there is nothing in there.

An image of an old phone booth at the Connecticut State Capital

 

NH STATE HOUSE – CONCORD, NH (2008)

Taken in 2008, when Verizon had left the state a year or so after this picture was taken. This modern look, shows a sliding door that goes around the other side of the booth.

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NH TELEPHONE MUSEUM (2015)

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WOODSTOCK BREWERY/RESORT – WOODSTOCK, NH

The phone doesn’t work, but it’s used as a cell phone booth to prevent being obnoxious  if one is out with people. 

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