Video: Ericsson Computer/Telephone Terminal

This is the the best tech ad! And the Sound FX is pure gold 😍 Ericsson ad. 1985🇸🇪

A post shared by 🌴🍉The Raddest '80s Account🌴🍉 (@neontalk) on

This is pretty rad for the 1980s. Just you need to have a supporting PBX or ESS service. The comments on the Instagram post from at-neontalk was amusing if you do not know what a “terminal” is…

The first digital like carphone can be seen near the end of the byte.

Glad to be a phone dude!

9-1-1 Awareness, part four

More on the last series on Enhanced 9-1-1 in the State of New Hampshire.

I mentioned Supplemental ALI being so exclusive, that if you were to Google it, the State’s Department of Safety’s page on this subject is on the first page of results. This special service is stored in a state database and when the number gets triggered into the state’s CTI system, this is how the special needs data appears.

This feature also can be used locally as I stated some states mandate in house Supplemental ALI provided by the customer if they have a MLTS. Be warned, if you make changes, you have to update your database. Cubicle numbers, conference rooms can appear, depending on the setup.

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Merch!

As teased for a while, The Museum of Telephony is floating a trial balloon for merchandise for extra revenue to keep the site fresh.

I used to have an Etsy store, but closed it as they have put a burden against sell-side users. See how long they last.

At some point, I’ll do some PayPal plugins so you can order right from the site!

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9-1-1 Awareness, part three

Where I live, I just turned thirty. Most thirty year olds are living in the 617 or 212 or 213 area codes but possibly are carrying cell numbers with 603 numbers. However if they call for an emergency, they would go to the closet PSAP where the tower is. There are people out there who “hate” the state they grew up. They won’t ever be coming back and sadly our PSAP is the most innovative in the country.

And even worse, no vendor doesn’t have the guts to defend our system, only to attack our lack of laws to protect troll attorneys if a 9-1-1 system is not properly configured in a business to sue the crap and put them out of business. I’m too lazy to pull up that Avaya blog post right now…

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9-1-1 Awareness, part two

So for the people never called 9-1-1 before, the procedure is:

  • You go to our single PSAP no matter what number in the 603 area code to ether a Concord or Laconia center. Both locations staffed at the max under 20 even during peak “drive time” hours to about eight total at night. (It was to my own surprise that the max of each call center can max to 22 operators at each location, which totals to 44. This has never happened.) Despite so many people of my generation never returning to the Granite State, there is a growth of population, and given the weekend population throughout the tourist locations, it’s a surprise that a state agency can handle that with so few “telecommunicators” as the state calls it.
  • They ether verify or ask for your location and number. Names aren’t relevant I suppose. The location is to ensure they are going to the right place, and secondly the number is to ensure a call is disconnected that they will ringback. Unlike private sector call centers, the 9-1-1 call is tied to that call taker until s/he drops the call. The way this works, if I am not mistaken you hang up, a few seconds later 9-1-1 will ring back, essentially calling you immediately. Essentially callbacks in emergency services are immediate wheras a customer service/support line may take a few minutes.
  • 9-1-1 calls shouldn’t under most circumstances be overwhelmed where you get a busy signal, but you do go into a queue if there is an overload of calls. Don’t hang up because if you do get next on the queue, they will automatically call you back!
  • They ask for your type of emergency. For the youngins out there; this 3-digit telephone number is for Fire, Medical and Police. If your call is medical, the E911 telecommunicators will go through an Emergency Medical Dispatch procedures. If you remember the days of Rescue 911* with those reenactments, they used to pull a flip chart. It’s now electronic. Despite the fact; there is specific set of questions to ask in the proper order; if the victim is breathing; having a heart attack or gagging on something; even childbirth or something worse. Some have considered this the “interrogation” of a 9-1-1 call.

* As I write this; I still can’t get over the irony that a few years after Rescue, Shatner lost his wife in a drowning situation but the 9-1-1 tapes clearly showed he didn’t do anything he learned on a show he hosted for almost a decade! About a decade ago, a Boston PM drive talk show host would play the tapes for a while for comic relief. C’mon, I had to be sassy at some point in this theme!

  • The local dispatch centers start to get wind of an emergency. It varies town by town, my town has a single dispatch for police and fire, my other town I grew up still has two separate dispatch facilities. There are monitors hardwired via a private Internet link back to the State that shares the same screen the telecommunicator is seeing. It’s at the town’s discretion whether to send help; ring the bells and whistles or just arrive at legal speed limits without bells and whistles.

This is my local dispatch center. This is NOT a PSAP, remember the Department of Safety is the ONLY PSAP in the state. This is a Police Department that also handles Fire and EMS calls.  The middle monitor that on a round turntable is that monitor that is hardwired via a VPN connection to the Department Of Safety’s 911 system. That monitor is identical to the state “telecommunicator”. This is typically used for medical emergencies, and the local dispatchers can triage emergency calls even before taking the call or even put a call out. However each town has their own way of dispatching and sending out calls. This was taken in 2014 at the Merrimack, NH Police Department.

  • The state “bridges” the call between the 9-1-1 and the local dispatch. This means you will hear voices throughout the entire call, and no tones.  In other states you may hear tones or ringing. For a layman end user, that’s not very promising. In the commonwealth of Massachusetts, if you call the statewide PSAP via your cell, they’ll most likely “trunk transfer” your call. What’s that? If you hear ringing, that’s what they are talking about. But will Fletch and the FCC do anything? Of course not! They hate business!
  • Now the emergency response should be responding at someway at this point

*

9-1-1 Awareness

This subject is for consumers and non enterprise users. I will not talk about PBX systems, ACD telephones, and the stuff alike. Only to the Average Joe caller in my state of New Hampshire

Your humble Curator went to the New Hampshire Telephone Museum Friday evening for community events the facility hosts in their basements during the fourth Fridays of the month. That evening, a spokesperson named Wanda from the New Hampshire 9-1-1 discussed for over an hour about our system and how vulnerable many citizens of my state could be.

@nhtelephonemuseum learning the history of the 911 system in my home state.

A post shared by The Museum of Telephony (@themuseumoftelephony) on

To start, if you think the 9-1-1 portrayals in movies and soap operas and other television shows where you call 9-1-1 and someone’s life will be saved in minutes; think again. The theme of Friday night’s discussion is that. 9-1-1 is not magical. 9-1-1 is not a perfect system. In my own words, 9-1-1 is clearly not magical and it’s not perfect. I’ve discussed 9-1-1’s move to perfection in the most illogical way in the past.

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